Passap Cut and Sew Neckline


passap neckline

Tina, this posting is for you. 🙂
Tina asked me if I all of my work was cut and sew(necklines)
I told her that I did knit one sweater and divided the work at the neck and finished each side. Would I do it again? Absolutely not. I am a definite believer in cut and sew for passap double bed work.
I used the side of a scarf that I started and did not like so you will see the stitches going sideways. lol Ladies, get your tension swatches out and lets try this technique.

Most of my sweaters I made were finished with the following technique that I will share with you. I just know it as the sandwich neckline. I believe it might also be called the commercial neckline. I have had this information for over 30 years so it has been around.
I read somewhere that a neckline will make or break a sweater and I believe that to be true. You can also add button and buttonhole bands and cuffs using this sandwich technique. I did this on a blue diamonte sweater that was posted on my blog.

The first step is to just knit the front of your sweater straight up from the armholes. Then take the shoulders off on separate pieces of waste yarn. Then take the middle neck stitches off on waste yarn. You will join one shoulder and then figure the number of stitches for your ribbing.

You can make neck templates from cardboard by using your favorite sweaters to see how much of a drop you like. I don’t like ribbing that chokes me so my templates are around 3 inches with a two inch tall ribbing. I also like the look of a 2 by 2 rib and you get more stretch so it is not too tight going over your head.
My sample is a 1 by 1. The ribbing is double so if you want a one inch ribbing and your gauge is 12 rows to one inch, you would knit 24 rows. My sample is 22 rows.

I always do tension swatches and launder the fabric and wait a day before knitting.
That way I know how many shoulder and neck stitches I will have to take off separately on waste yarn.
When I knit the back of my sweater I do a one inch drop. I do the same as for the front neckline but just make a straight line one inch from edge and angle the line up to the shoulders. When you see how the front is done this will make sense to you.

I have pictures showing you how I do this along with some more instructions in the drop box link below.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/mm6dk3z2ac0yqtm/Finishing%20a%20neckline%20using%20the%20back%20stitch%20by%20hand.pdf?dl=0

 

 

My next posting will be the cut and sew without the sandwich. I have added a pdf file with both of these instructions if you want to try them . I also have a sheet that explains the procedure in detail. If you have any problems or questions, feel free to email me. Hope you try it!
Happy Knitting!

2 Comments »

  1. John Pender Said:

    Hiya-

    I have an E6000 question for you. My wife has one, and it all works, but managing the connection between the console and a modern computer is a huge pain. The E6000 came with a cable that would connect with an old Windows computer using a DB9 or DB15 connector but computers no longer have these ports unless you go out of your way to special order one. A few years ago my wife bought some cables from some outfit in the Netherlands (I think) that allowed you to connect the console to a USB port, but you still need to run Windows.

    I have done lot of work with microprocessor boards and it occurred to me that a guy could replace the console entirely with something like an Arduino Yun board that has built-in internet so you don’t need to cable to a computer at all. What’s more, any computer operating system would be able to upload patterns to the Yun board. Do you happen to know where I could get technical specs for the E6000 console so that I could figure out how the console is driving the locks to make some unique color pattern? I am doing this for funsies, but if I get it running then perhaps we could work out a deal to sell them to other people.

    Thanks for your time,

    John Pender
    http://www.goldstreamsolar.com

    • Someone has hacked the console and used an Arduino Uno R3. This project was 6 years ago and I have never heard anything else about it. I do know there was another hack where 2 front consoles were used to pattern on both beds. Here is a link for further reading on the Arduino project. https://github.com/borgstrom/KnitterStream


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