Passap 6000, Watching the Back Bed Pushers using Technique 181


DSCF1781

DSCF1783My friend Sue asked about knitting with cotton on the passap so I decided to try some cotton I found in my stash of yarn . I also wanted to see how a new pattern I found would look knitted up. I decided to knit a dishcloth so I would have something to use when I finished.

I finished the first one and I did not like the edge stitches. I had both end needles on the front bed. I made a second one and used the end needles on the back bed. LOL, they look the same. On my second one I decided to match the beginning and end so the pattern looks complete. That is the longer one. On the one with the white back I used the carmen router rule and both edges look just okay-not great.

I decided to try technique 181. Technique 181 knits a solid color on the back. While I was knitting the first ones, I noticed that the back was not solid. Hmmmm….I am not doing something right. I finished and decided to try it again using a pattern in the console instead of downloading. In technique 181 all the pushers are in work on the front bed and all the pushers are used on the back bed. However, only the end needles on the back bed on the right and left have pushers in work position .The rest of the pushers are resting AGAINST the rail, not inside the rail. (all the rest of the pushers not in the needles selected for the pattern are in the rail.)

I have written what happens and how it looks to get it right.  You must try this. This machine is amazing. If you don’t see the pushers in the positions that I have explained, you won’t get a solid back. I have done this a couple of times and ended up with a birdseye back like the first one I did here. That is why I went back and studied what was happening. I hope that you try this just to see how it knits.

As far as knitting with cotton, this is a gloss 100% cotton. It is strong and has a beautiful sheen to it. It knits nothing like the 6/4 and 8/2 cotton that I have. I had to loosen the mast tensions AND I could have knitted a looser tension and let the washing machine shrink it to size. If you try this I don’t suggest this kind of cotton for a first  try. I would use 2 strands of 2/24 and use tension 2,3,and 4.. for the cast on. The yarn had a price tag of 23 dollars on it and was marked down to 11 dollars. I believe a friend gave this to me that was getting out of knitting. It was made at Ruby Mills in North Carolina. It is a beautiful cotton, it is a shame to use for dish cloths. lol

The  directions for trying this technique are in my drop box. Would love to know if you try this and are successful .

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/dp0s9f18dgc0lmo/AADLTMQbqCULy6cXY3AxbYgga?dl=0

 

 

7 Comments »

  1. Gillian Pearson Said:

    I have done this before for a couple of scarves and its nice to have a solid back with the back colour showing on the edges. Your experiments on the passap reminds us of all the different techniques we overlook. Thanks.

    • Hi Gillian , I tried a long time ago to do a fair isle on one side and plain on the other and the edges did not look nice. Is there a rule as to how to set the end needles for certain techniques? I never see any information on this and yet it is critical information for the outcome of the knitted item. I know about the Carmen router rule and a lot of patterns will tell you to ignore that rule and set up differently. But, not all do that.

      Carol 🙂

  2. Susan McBean Said:

    I will let you know how I make out! 🙂

    • Yay, I just started a second one and the pushers lined up the opposite of what I wrote and now the opposite color is the solid back. So if steps 1 to 4 are followed, the color should stay the same for the background. Confused? so am i!!!!!

  3. Dear John, How would this work on a Duo 80, or would it.?? I have been ” gifted ” an old machine, and it is all ” Greek ” to me Thank you, Eva Mary Surtel

    • I don’t know if this question is directed to me since it says Dear John.

  4. Cristina Said:

    Thank you for sharing. The dropbox folder is empty


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