Passap Knitting Tubular using OX/DX


I have a book called Pat’s Passap Primer.  I was leafing  through the book and I find a pattern for a bottle cover knitted in tubular tuck stitch. This looks interesting. Here is a picture of the diagram in the Duett International Magazine. Next to it is the set up from the pattern from Pat Wetzel.  Look at the pusher arrangement in technique 163. It is the opposite of the E6000.

tubulartuckknitting001 tubulartuckknitting002

 

Tuck stitch side

Tuck stitch side

Lousy lookingside

Lousy looking side

 

I read the pattern and it says to use the settings DX on both locks. Well, the E 6000 does not have that letter D on the front lock so I figured the pattern was for the DM80. So I played around and came to the conclusion it was OX that I used on the front bed. I set up the needles and it would knit every other stitch  and tuck every other stitch on the back bed but not on the front bed. I tried and tried and nothing worked. The back bed would knit perfectly but the front put the tuck stitch on the back bed closing the tube.  I gave up and  I walked away for a few days. Then a light bulb went off. The console must have to be on. DUH! I found my book of techniques and technique 163 was what I used and the settings were OX/DX. And in the technique book it shows that the pushers on the opposite bed are the opposite of what the pattern said. So I try it again and I was able to make a bottle cover. Of course, I had too much weight on and the bottle cover  came out longer. But that wasn’t the only problem. The racking handle is up and the needles face each other . I had a nice seam edge on the left side but when the yarn came around and knitted from the right to the left there was a loop on the end needle because it was a tuck stitch. So I made another in red and white stripes and I decided to hand knit the one stitch with the loop on it. Better, but I would not be happy with it. So I talked to my girlfriend Sheila and at the same time we said ” Add another end needle on the right front bed . The pushers on the left end stitches were both in the up position but it looks okay. On the right, the back bed was in the down position and I put the first one on the right end in the up position.  I did that and it looks nice. The tuck side is pretty but the bottle cover looked so plain but this is listed as an easy project.

Sooooooooo…. here is what I came up with. The tuck side is pretty but the other side  looks like ribbing. My thoughts were, this would look nice as the body of the sock after the ribbing.  So I used some sock yarn and just cast on with waste yarn  and knitted the tube using the extra needle. You can see a line when the yarn is at rest but when I put it over the calf of my leg(yes, that is my leg on the machine-lol) it stretches out and you don’t see it. The picture of it on my leg (below)is with the knit side on the outside. Just a thought for those of you that make socks on the passap. I used Serenity sock yarn at a tension of 6../6..  I did another sample and tried knitting a tighter tension and it made the tuck pattern almost fade away. This sample was knit with 25 back bed stitches and 26 front bed stitches and it is too large for me as it gets to my ankle. You would have to play around with your tension and you can always do decreases as you get to the ankle. Pat’s pattern has you do the three row cast on and then transfer stitches to the front bed. Very difficult to hang a weight. So I think if you did one inch of ribbing, transferred the stitches to the front bed you will have adequate knitting to hang sock weights on. I tried it and it worked nicely. So this was my learning experience for the week. 🙂

Knitted Side

Knitted Side

 

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